Why did the Roman Empire eventually accept Christianity?

Some scholars allege that his main objective was to gain unanimous approval and submission to his authority from all classes, and therefore chose Christianity to conduct his political propaganda, believing that it was the most appropriate religion that could fit with the Imperial cult (see also Sol Invictus).

Why did the Romans eventually accept Christianity?

1) Christianity was a form of a “group”. People became a part of this group; it was a form of leadership for the Roman emperor. This for the people was a relief, they had something new to look forward to. This is historically important because this shed new light, and influenced people’s perspectives and beliefs.

How did Christianity come to be accepted in the Roman Empire?

Rome becomes Christian

In 313 CE, the emperor Constantine issued the Edict of Milan, which granted Christianity—as well as most other religions—legal status.

How did Romans respond to Christianity?

Over time, the Christian church and faith grew more organized. In 313 AD, the Emperor Constantine issued the Edict of Milan, which accepted Christianity: 10 years later, it had become the official religion of the Roman Empire.

Why did the Romans not like Christianity?

Although it is often claimed that Christians were persecuted for their refusal to worship the emperor, general dislike for Christians likely arose from their refusal to worship the gods or take part in sacrifice, which was expected of those living in the Roman Empire.

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How did Christianity differ from the Roman religion?

The two religions have many differences, first and foremost being that the Roman religion is polytheistic and Christianity is monothestic. The ranks of the two religions also differ greatly. In Christianity, God is above all. Prophets delivered messages from God, but were not held higher than the rest of man.